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Examinations:

Our veterinarians assess your pet's health status through physical examinations, analysis of laboratory data, and consultations with you.
Regular physical examinations are essential to monitor animal health, especially since the patient cannot communicate with the doctor.

Your veterinarian will perform a complete, comprehensive examination of your pet's body systems, taking note of any abnormalities, and formulating an overall picture of their current health status. She will also talk about preventative care and address any concerns you may have pertaining to your pet's condition. If your veterinarian detects any abnormalities during the examination, she will discuss available treatment options.

At the Milton Veterinary Hospital, we take great care to educate and keep you, the caretaker, abreast of your pet's health or medical problems. Good communication and diligent follow-up care is often the key to successful treatments and recovery.

Examinations are offered by appointment Mondays through Saturdays and a full schedule of our office hours can be viewed on our home page by clicking (here).

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Vaccinations:

Very young puppies and kittens are highly susceptible to infectious diseases as their natural immunity provided in their mothers' milk gradually wears off. For the first few months of life, animals should receive a series of vaccinations, usually 3-4 weeks apart, to decrease the risk of infection and to provide optimal protection against disease. Our veterinarians typically administer the final vaccine of the series to 16-week-old puppies and kittens.

Traditionally, annual vaccinations were considered normal and necessary for dogs and cats. Through medical advancement, veterinarians have learned more about vaccines and their effect on immune systems; there is increasing evidence that the immunity triggered by some vaccines may provide protection beyond one year. However, other vaccines may fail to stimulate immunity for a full year, depending on exposure risks. Therefore, your veterinarian will tailor a vaccination program specifically for your pet to help maintain a lifetime of infectious disease protection.

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Heartworm Disease:

All dogs and cats are susceptible to Heartworm Disease, including animals that stay inside 100% of the time. Pets develop Heartworm Disease after an infected mosquito transmits the parasite. Heartworm Disease is very serious and it can be lethal. Fortunately, excellent Heartworm preventatives are available.

A quick and easy test can determine if your dog has Heartworm Disease; however, diagnosing the disease in cats can be more difficult. Although it is important to obtain a negative Heartworm test in dogs over six months of age prior to beginning the preventative, cats can sometimes start Heartworm preventative without a test. You and your veterinarian will develop an appropriate, individualized preventative program for your pet.

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Reminders:

Milton Veterinary Hospital clients receive notifications to keep their pet(s) up to date, including, but not limited to, reminders for exams, vaccines, Heartworm tests, and fecal exams.

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Housecalls:

If you prefer to have your pet examined in the comfort of your own home, we can arrange a house call for you.

House call visits are by appointment and are limited to general examinations, vaccinations, and euthanasia.

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Spay: (ovariohysterectomy)

An ovariohysterectomy, or spay, is the surgical removal of the ovaries, uterus, and associated structures of the female reproductive system. After an ovariohysterectomy, female patients will no longer be able to conceive offspring.. Our veterinarians usually perform this surgery on young, healthy animals; nevertheless, we can spay animals of any age.

Responsible pet owners arrange to have their female pet spayed to help control the increasing animal population; however, spaying also greatly reduces the incidence of mammary tumors and it eliminates the risk of ovarian cancer, uterine infections, and uterine cancer.

As with any surgery, the procedure includes recommended pre-anesthetic blood testing, anesthesia, surgical process, post-operative intensive care, and pain management.

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Neuter:(castration)

The term neuter actually refers to both male and female surgical sterilization procedure, however, has become common language more associated with male castration.

A castration is the surgical removal of the testicles. After castration, male patients will no longer be able to reproduce. Our veterinarians usually perform this surgery on young, healthy animals; nevertheless, we can castrate animals of any age.

Responsible pet owners arrange to have their male pet neutered to help control the increasing animal population; however, castration also decreases the incidence of most prostate diseases and it eliminates the risk of testicular cancer. Furthermore, castration reduces many negative, undesirable male characteristics, such as aggression, roaming, decreased trainability, and territorial marking.

As with any surgery, the procedure includes recommended pre-anesthetic blood testing, anesthesia, surgical process, post-operative intensive care, and pain management.

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Soft Tissue Surgery:

Any surgical procedure involving anatomy other than the skeletal system falls under the category of soft tissue surgery. There are many different types of procedures within this category, including, but not limited to, elective, preventative, corrective, traumatic, diagnostic, and cosmetic surgeries. Examples of these surgeries include the sterilization surgeries, tumor removals, laceration/wound repairs, biopsies, and abdominal exploratories.

We recommend pre-anesthetic blood testing prior to all surgical procedures; these tests may evaluate liver function, kidney function, protein levels, electrolyte levels, glucose levels, and the blood cell lines (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets), among other important information selected by you and your veterinarian to ensure the safest anesthetic event possible.

We use the safest injectable and inhalant anesthetics available in veterinary medicine and we carefully monitor the anesthetized patient with a pulse oximeter, ECG, respiratory monitor, blood pressure monitor and a qualified veterinary technician.

We maintain appropriate pain management pre-operatively, intra-operatively, and post-operatively, which continues when your pet goes home.

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Orthopedic Surgery:

Any surgical procedure involving the skeletal system (bones, joints, ligaments, and tendons) falls under the category of orthopedic surgery. Examples of these surgeries include the management of broken bones, ruptured ligament stabilization, tumor removals that may involve bone or amputation, and procedures to aid in the treatment of hip dysplasia.

We recommend pre-anesthetic blood testing prior to all surgical procedures; these tests may evaluate liver function, kidney function, protein levels, electrolyte levels, glucose levels, and the blood cell lines (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets), among other important information selected by you and your veterinarian to ensure the safest anesthetic event possible.

We use the safest injectable and inhalant anesthetics available in veterinary medicine and we carefully monitor the anesthetized patient with a pulse oximeter, ECG, respiratory monitor, blood pressure monitor and a qualified veterinary technician.

We maintain appropriate pain management pre-operatively, intra-operatively, and post-operatively, which continues when your pet goes home.

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Radiology:

Radiographs, or x-rays, play an essential role in diagnostics for our patients. Our in-house radiology unit provides us with high quality diagnostic imaging, rapidly developed via our automatic processor. Our veterinarians are able to interpret most films immediately, but they can also obtain consults from board certified radiologists on the more unusual cases.

We take radiographs on patients without anesthesia in many situations; however, sometimes sedation is required.

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Laboratory:

Our in-house laboratory consists of several technologically advanced machines and various testing modalities that provide us with essential diagnostics. Our blood chemistry, CBC (complete blood count), and electrolyte units report vital statistics within minutes; our veterinarians interpret these results and gain valuable information about the organ function, blood cells, and blood components of our patients.

We also routinely perform in-house testing for Heartworm Disease, Lyme Disease, Ehrlichia, Anaplasmosis, Feline Leukemia Virus, Feline Immunodeficiency Virus, and Giardia. We can complete a full urinalysis, examine feces for parasites, and do fungal cultures.

If our veterinarians require more involved testing, they have access to one of the largest external laboratories in the United States with a rapid turn around for results.

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Electrocardiogram:

An electrocardiogram, or ECG, is a machine that monitors and graphs the electrical signals of the heart. It provides diagnostic information about the heart's rate and rhythm; our veterinarians use the ECG machine to identify electrical disturbances and abnormalities in our patient's hearts.

We also use the ECG to monitor every anesthetized patient. In addition, our veterinarians may recommend an ECG screening during a geriatric patient examination.

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Preventative Dental Care:

The key to maintaining good oral health in our patients is prevention of disease.
Regular dental examinations by our veterinarians and daily brushing of your pet's teeth will help maintain a healthy mouth. Brushing removes soft plaque before it becomes hard tartar. We have animal-safe toothpaste, cat toothbrushes and finger toothbrushes to help make brushing easier. We also provide gels and rinses to aid in preventative dental care.

 

pat dental logo

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Dental Treatments:

Dental cleanings are completed with general anesthesia; therefore, we recommend pre-anesthetic blood testing to evaluate liver function, kidney function, protein levels, electrolyte levels, glucose levels, and the blood cell lines (red blood cells, white blood cells, platelets), among other important information selected by you and your veterinarian to ensure the safest anesthetic event possible.

Your veterinarian will prescribe antibiotics to begin prior to the dental procedure and to continue after your animal goes home.

Once we safely anesthetize your pet, we perform a thorough oral exam, noting any areas of specific disease or damage. We then use an ultrasonic dental scaling unit, similar to the unit in your dentistís office, to remove calculus from the teeth and under the gums. We also use hand scalers and other dental instruments to clean your petís mouth completely. Then, we polish the teeth and finish with a fluoride treatment.

If single or multiple tooth extractions are necessary, we will usually do the extraction procedure during the dental. We maintain appropriate pain management pre-operatively, intra-operatively, and post-operatively, which continues when your pet goes home, usually the same day as the procedure.

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Laser Therapy:

Milton Veterinary Hospital has recently purchased a Class IV laser. A relatively new branch of medicine, the Class IV laser delivers a large amount of light energy into the petís body. When it interacts with damaged cells, healing is accelerated and pain, swelling,and inflammation are virtually eliminated.
As our best friends age, and need relief from everyday aches and pains, or recover from trauma or surgery, this advanced technology offers: drug-free, surgery-free, pain-free relief.

Emergency Services (24 Hour):

If you have an animal emergency, please call our office at: 893-4000
In the event that our hospital is closed, our answering service will direct you to the Burlington Emergency Veterinary Services (BEVS).

The phone number for BEVS is 863-BEVS(2387) and is located at 200 Commerce Street in Williston.

Located near Tafts Corners. From exit 12 off I89; follow Rte 2A north for 3/4 mile. Turn left onto Rte 2A (Williston Road) for 1/2 mile and turn left onto Commerce Street. BEVS is located 1/8 mile down on the right. www.bevsvt.com

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